Batgirl III's Thread (A Short Victorious War)

Discuss our dark fantasy adventure tabletop roleplaying game based on BioWare's computer game, Dragon Age Origins.

Batgirl III's Thread (A Short Victorious War)

Postby Batgirl III » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:04 pm

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Some of you may be familar with me from Green Ronin's Mutants & Masterminds forum, the Atomic Think Tank, specifically my creatively name thread in the Roll Call subforum, Batgirl III's Character Thread where I have posted something north of 350+ builds, multiple Game Mastering essays, a few rants, and a more than a few jokes about batarangs.

Although Mutants & Masterminds still retains its place in my heart, I hope to be able to bring my personal brand of roll up the sleeves, make it work, rule of cool gamemastering to bear on Dragon Age.

Enjoy your stay. Watch out for the bats.

Table of Contents (a/k/a Coming Soon)
Houserules
* New Backgrounds
* Mabari Wardog PCs
World Building
* DA:O Codex Collection
Character Builds
* Phidaeux (Mabari Wardog PC)
Adventures
* Old Basilisk Fort
* The Honor of the Arlessa
* A Short Victorious War
* Forrest of Dishonor
* Flags in Exile
Bat-Rants
* Batgirl III's Guide to Being an Evil DM.
* Batgirl III's Guide to House-RUles, or, How I Stopped Tinkering and Learn to Love the RAW.
Last edited by Batgirl III on Thu Jan 14, 2010 10:39 am, edited 8 times in total.
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Postby Batgirl III » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:05 pm

New Background: Chasind Wilder (Human)
The Chasind "wilders" have lived in the Korcari Wilds since the first wars with the Alamarri drove them southward a millennium ago. According to their own lore, they had always been a forest-dwelling people that adapted quickly to their new home. Game and fish are plentiful in the wetlands, and the Chasind thrived.

For a time, they and the hill-dwelling Avvars were true threats to the northern lowlands. The Tevinter Imperium had arrived and was hard-pressed to keep back the waves of invasions from the south and the west. The fortress of Ostagar was built specifically to watch for Chasind hordes venturing north of the tree line. It was not until the legendary warrior Hafter soundly defeated the Chasind in the first half of the Divine Age that the question of their ability to contest the lowlands was settled permanently.

Today, the Chasind are considered largely peaceful, though their ways are still primitive compared to our own. In the Korcari Wilds they live in strange-looking huts built on stilts or even built into the great treetops. They paint their faces and are split into small tribes ruled by shamans like those amongst the Avvars. There are many tales of these shamans having learned their magic from the "Witches of the Wilds," witches that inspire as much terror as they do awe and gratitude even if there is no definitive proof they exist. In particular, the tale of Flemeth, the greatest witch of the wilds, is celebrated amongst all tribes.

While there is no way to know how many there are in the Wilds today, few travelers that pass through the forests tell of Chasind eking out an existence even in the frozen wastelands of the far south. One can assume that should the Chasind ever organize themselves once more, we might have reason to fear them here in Ferelden. We ignore them at our peril.

–From Ferelden: Folklore and History, by Sister Petrine, Chantry scholar

2d6 --- Benefit
2 +1 Dexterity
3-4 Focus: Dexterity (Stealth)
5 Focus: Constitution (Swimming)
6 Focus: Strength (Climbing)
7-8 +1 Cunning
9 Focus: Strength (Jumping)
10-11 Focus: Constitution (Stamina)
12 +1 Strength

*Add 1 to you Constitution, the Chasind are a hale and hearty breed.
*Pick one of the following ability focuses: Cunning (Natural Lore) or
*You can speak the Trade Tongue.
*Choose a class: You can play either a warrior or a rogue.

New Background: Ferelden Noble (Human)
To our neighbors, Ferelden seems utterly chaotic. Unlike other monarchies, power does not descend from our throne. Rather, it rises from the support of the freeholders.

Each freehold chooses the bann or arl to whom it pays allegiance. Typically, this choice is based on proximity of the freehold to the lord's castle, as it's worthless to pay for the upkeep of soldiers who will arrive at your land too late to defend it. For the most part, each generation of freeholders casts its lot with the same bann as their fathers did, but things can and do change. No formal oaths are sworn, and it is not unheard of, especially in the prickly central Bannorn, for banns to court freeholders away from their neighbors–a practice which inevitably begets feuds that last for ages.

Teyrns arose from amongst the banns, war-leaders who, in antiquity, had grown powerful enough to move other banns to swear fealty to them. There were many teyrns in the days before King Calenhad, but he succeeded in whittling them down to only two: Gwaren in the south, Highever in the north. These teyrns still hold the oaths of banns and arls who they may call upon in the event of war or disaster, and similarly, the teyrns still hold responsibility for defending those sworn to them.

The arls were established by the teyrns, given command of strategic fortresses that could not be overseen by the teyrns themselves. Unlike the teyrns, the arls have no banns sworn to them, and are simply somewhat more prestigious banns.

The king is, in essence, the most powerful of the teyrns. Although Denerim was originally the teyrnir of the king, it has since been reduced to an arling, as the king's domain is now all of Ferelden. But even the king's power must come from the banns.

Nowhere is this more evident than during the Landsmeet, an annual council for which all the nobles of Ferelden gather, held for almost three thousand years except odd interruptions during Blights and invasions. The sight of a king asking for–and working to win–the support of "lesser" men is a source of constant wonder to foreign ambassadors.

–From Ferelden: Folklore and History, by Sister Petrine, Chantry scholar.

2d6 --- Benefit
2 +1 Perception
3-4 Focus: Dexterity (Caligraphy)
5 Focus: Commuication (Deception)
6 Focus: Willpower (Faith)
7-8 +1 Communication
9 Focus: Perception (Seeing)
10-11 Focus: Cunning (Heraldry)
12 +1 Willpower

*Add 1 to your Cunning ability. All nobles are well-schooled, both with formal education and in the more subtle intrigues of politics.
*Pick one of the following ability focuses: Communication (Animal Handling) or Perception (Empathy)
*You can speak and read the Trade Tongue, or, as you call it, the King's Tongue.
*Choose a class: You can play either a Warrior or a Rogue.

New Background: Orzammar Exile (Dwarf)
As dangerous as it is to mistake a dwarf's caste, it is far more deadly to mistake his alliances among the noble houses of Orzammar. Everyone in the city is allied with someone, whether by blood or by word. The nobles do not engage directly in commerce themselves, as that is the domain of the Merchant Caste, but they do serve as patrons. They invest in shops or in artisans' work, and in turn reap a share of the profits as well as a measure of the credit. Merchants and warriors alike benefit from the service of a prestigious patron.

The relative power of each house is ever-changing. It is usually safe to assume that whichever noble house holds the throne is at the top of the heap, but below that, things grow into a tangled mess. Houses ally with one another by marriage. They earn rank and prestige when combatants loyal to them, or from their own bloodlines, win Provings. They earn it when artisans they patronize become sought-after or well regarded, or when the merchants they invest in become successful. The degrees of power that these achievements confer is so murky, even to the dwarves, that it isn't unusual for nobles to challenge each another to Provings over whose smith forges better belt buckles, or whose servants have the best manners. Nor is it out of the ordinary to find two merchants arguing over whose noble patron has won the most acclaim, for the rank of the patron is the rank of the client.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the Assembly, where the deshyrs, representatives of each noble house, meet. Although the king technically rules Orzammar, kings are elected by the Assembly, and so each king must work constantly to maintain the support of the deshyrs. Kings who prove unpopular find their heirs deemed unacceptable to inherit the throne. Power then passes to another house.

–From In Pursuit of Knowledge: The Travels of A Chantry Scholar, by Brother Genitivi.

2d6 --- Benefit
2 +1 Perception
3-4 Focus: Strength (Axes)
5 Focus: Commuication (Leadership)
6 Focus: Willpower (Self-Discipline)
7-8 +1 Communication
9 Focus: Perception (Searching)
10-11 Focus: Cunning (Engineering)
12 +1 Willpower

*Add 1 to your Cunning ability. The noble houses of Orzamar are infamous for hiding their viscious political infighting behind layers of honor and duty.
*Pick one of the following ability focuses: Communication(Deception) or Cunning (Historical Lore)
*You can speak and read Dwarven and the Trade Tongue.
*Choose a class: You can play either a Warrior or a Rogue.

New Background: Antivian Merchant-Prince (Human)
In the rest of the civilized world, it is common belief that Antiva has no king. I assure you, gentle readers, that this is untrue. The line of kings in Antiva has remained unbroken for two and a half thousand years–it is simply that nobody pays any attention to them whatsoever.

The nation is ruled in truth by a collection of merchant princes. They are not princes in the literal sense, but heads of banks, trading companies, and vineyards. Their power is conferred strictly by wealth.

But Antiva is not primarily renowned for its peculiar form of government, nor for its admittedly unparalleled wines. Antiva is known for the House of Crows. Since Antivans are well-known for being good at everything but fighting, it is more than a little ironic that Antiva possesses the most deadly assassins in the world. Their fame is such that Antiva keeps no standing army: No king is willing to order his troops to assault her borders, and no general is mad enough to lead such an invasion. The attack would likely succeed, but its leaders would not see the day.

–From In Pursuit of Knowledge: The Travels of a Chantry Scholar, by Brother Genitivi.

2d6 --- Benefit
2 +1 Cunning
3-4 Focus: Cunning (Cultural Lore)
5 Focus: Dexterity (Light Blades)
6 Focus: Dexterity (Initiative)
7-8 +1 Perception
9 Focus: Communication (Persuasion)
10-11 Focus: Willpower (Couragage)
12 +1 Dexterity

*Add 1 to your Communication ability. Antivians are known for their razor-sharp wit (and daggers).
*Pick one of the following ability focuses: Communication (Bargaining) or Perception (Seeing)
*You can speak and read Antivian and the Trade Tongue.
*Choose a class: You can play either a Warrior or a Rogue.
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Postby Batgirl III » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:05 pm

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Advanced Background: Mabari War Dog
Dogs are an essential part of Ferelden culture, and no dog is more prized than the Mabari. The breed is as old as myth: Said to have been bred from the wolves who served the legendary hero, Dane. Prized for their intelligence and loyalty, these dogs are more than mere weapons or status symbols: The hounds choose their masters, and pair with them for life. To be the master of a Mabari anywhere in Ferelden is to be recognized instantly as a person of worth.

The Mabari are an essential part of Ferelden military strategy. Trained hounds can easily pull knights from horseback or break lines of pike men, and the sight and sound of a wave of war dogs, howling and snarling, has been known to cause panic among even the most hardened infantry soldiers.

Communication: 2d6+1
Cunning: 3d6
Dexterity: 3d6
Magic: 1d6+2
Perception: 3d6+2
Strength: 3d6+2
Willpower: 3d6

Speed: Calculate as Elf.
Bite Attack: Brawling Weapons Group. 1d6+2+Strength Damage.

2d6 --- Benefit
2 +1 Constitution
3-4 Focus: Dexterity (Brawling)
5 Focus: Constitution (Swimming)
6 Focus: Strength (Might)
7-8 +1 Cunning
9 Focus: Strength (Jumping)
10-11 Focus: Constitution (Stamina)
12 +1 Strength

*Pick two of the following ability focuses: Perception (Tracking), Constitution (Running), or Perception (Hearing)
*Choose a class: You can play either a warrior or a rogue.

Gameplay Factors
Mabari war dogs different from standard player characters in the DARPG in numerous ways, as a result they are not recommend for use by inexperienced role-players or novice gamemasters.

Limited Equipment: A mabari war dog is, obviously, not remotely human or dwarven shaped, and lacks hands. As a result the majority of equipment in DARPG will be unusable by a mabari war dog. They cannot use weapons, pitch tents, tie ropes, etcetera. However, given the honored position of dogs in Ferelden society, it is possible for a mabari;s master to purchase specially crafted armor for their animals. Such armor has the same properties as any other armor of its type, but costs half again as much (x1.5 cost). Outside of Ferelden, it is virtually unheard of for anyone to armor animals this way, although an armorsmith who can craft barding for horses may be able to do the same for a mabari... the cost it left to the GM's discretion.

Limited Language: A mabari war dog cannot speak any language, although they understand the language or languages of their masters -- which nearly always means the King's Tongue of Ferelden. Typically, a heroic mabari looks to his or her master handle interpersonal communications... although a mabari's emotions and intent are rarely misunderstood.

Gameplay: The mabari war dog's player may narrative the dog's body language, actions, and activities, but may not speak to communicate, apart from barks, growls, whines, and other canine noises.

Bonded Master: Most heroic mabari accompany master with whom they have developed a deep and inexplicable bond -- although they do not share any true language a mabari's master is able to understand his companion on a deeper level.

Gameplay: When generating attributes for the mabari war dog, the player should note the total number rolled for Cunning (i.e., the result of the 3d6 roll, not the final modifier [-2 thru 4]) this should be noted as the mababri's Vocabulary Score. The player may select a number of single words equal to that Vocabulary Score (i.e., Master, Enemy, Play, Cat, Horse, etc.) The mabari's player may use one or more of those words as normal language when communicating with his master (i.e., "Master Me Play"). In combat or other stressful situations, the mababri may only use as many of those words in a "sentence" as a free action as his Communication attribute (i.e., if Phideaux has a Communication of 2, he can say "Master Help!" but not "Master help me by flanking the ogre.")

New Talent: Mabari Warfare
Class: Warrior or Rogue
Requires: Mabari
Novice: Growl As a Minor Action, the mabari growls so fearsomely that one opponent within four yards must make a Willpower (Self-Discipline) test vs. the Mabari's Strength (Intimidate) test or suffer a -2 to its Defense until the beginning of the mabari's next turn.
Journeyman: Dread Howl The mabari lets out a loud howl, and all enemies within ten yards must make a Willpower (Self-Discipline) test vs. the Mabari's Strength (Intimidate) test and suffer a –1 penalty on all ability tests until the beginning of the mabari's next turn, any enemy which fails the opposed test suffers the same penalty and cannot take any actions on their next turn.
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Postby Riggswolfe » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:08 pm

Nice. Also, another one of the posters here made a noble background as well. You ought to look at it. Maybe you two could team up. :)
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Postby ClassDunce » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:20 pm

This is Awesome Batgirl, maybe we can see you putting together some builds as well? I hadn't thought about making a Chasind background but with them being in the game more than the Avvarri Hillsfolk it makes sense.

Also I totally dig the Dwarven Exile.
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Postby Andferne » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:21 pm

Nice work Batgirl.
The world still needs Heroes
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Postby Saisei » Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:59 pm

Riggswolfe wrote:Nice. Also, another one of the posters here made a noble background as well. You ought to look at it. Maybe you two could team up. :)


Haha yeah that was me. Our Nobles seem to be very very similar! great minds ;)

Also your Dwarven Exile is quite similar to what I statted up for a Dwarven Noble (Same idea really).

always nice to have more options
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Postby psychodrive » Mon Dec 14, 2009 4:19 pm

Batgirl III wrote:New Background: Chasind Wilder (Human)
<snip>

*Pick one of the following ability focuses: Cunning (Natural Lore) or


Or?

Unless you had something planned, Cunning (Navigation) would seem appropriate, or Perception (Tracking).
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Postby Divyr Cousland » Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:19 pm

Beautiful. I have yet to buy the game but your human noble is inspiring.
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Postby angel_lord » Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:30 pm

Very nice. I am looking forward to compiling some of these ideas as options for my players.
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Postby Riggswolfe » Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:33 pm

BTW, Batgirl, Green Ronin needs to bring you on staff. It looks like you could make a supplement book all on your own!
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Postby Andferne » Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:23 pm

Riggswolfe wrote:BTW, Batgirl, Green Ronin needs to bring you on staff. It looks like you could make a supplement book all on your own!


I approve of this message. ^^
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Postby Batgirl III » Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:36 pm

Aww, shucks. :oops:
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Postby Batgirl III » Tue Dec 15, 2009 6:45 am

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Phidaeux
Background: Mabari War Dog
Class: Rogue (Level 1)

Communication: 1
Constitution 1 [Swimming]
Cunning: 2
Dexterity: 0 [Stealth]
Magic: -2
Perception: 4 [Tracking, Hearing]
Strength: 3
Willpower: 2

Speed: 12
Defense: 10
Health: 31

Talents: Novice Mabari War Hound

Phidaeux is a rarity amongst Mabari, having formed a bond with a merchant captain and duelist named Jon Crayton. Phidaeux mirrors his master's style in battle, favoring speed and harrying strikes to straight forward attacks of more military-bred war dogs.
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Postby Riggswolfe » Tue Dec 15, 2009 7:41 am

Interesting. I'd probably use the dog as an npc rather than allow a player to make one but it's definitely an interesting concept. I look forward to more! Btw, over on RPGnet your name has come up in the long Dragon Age thread where the game is being hotly debated.
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Postby Riggswolfe » Tue Dec 15, 2009 10:40 am

Hey, Batigrl, would it be alright if I crossposed this into the massive RPGnet thread so they can talk about it over there?
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Postby Drew D Scott » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:22 am

Excellent, excellent work Batgirl. Doubtless this thread will become an invaluable trove for old and new players alike. I look forward to reading more.
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Postby Riggswolfe » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:31 am

I don't know if they do this, but this thread really ought to be stickied!
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Postby Drew D Scott » Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:36 am

Seconded.
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Postby Batgirl III » Tue Dec 15, 2009 1:09 pm

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Batgirl's Gamemastering Tips
A Dragon Age RPG Rules Rant

I started playing role-playing games when I was seven years old, with a new game called Dungeons & Dragons, there was an eighteen year age difference between me and the next youngest player, our 23-year old Dungeon Master. Like me, the DM was new to the hobby having started with the "new" D&D. The other guys were all old school veterans. One or two were still bitter about the switch from the "old and better edition" a little ball of fun called Chainmail. Ah, the 1980's, those were the days... Anyhow, I ran my first game as DM in 1990, rocks fell, everybody died. I tell you all this just to prove that I've been around a long while. I don't lay claim to being the World's Greatest Game Master, nor do I consider myself any sort of expert. But, I'm a crazy old coot and I like the sound of my own voice (er, keyboard). So, here's my thoughts on what I think a GM needs to do to run a simple game. Its a two step process. Let go of the book and let go of the players.

Let go of the book!
Most of the time in when I'm running a game, and I need to resolve an issue, I don’t use the rules; I make rulings.

It’s easy to understand that sentence, but it takes a flash of insight to really “get it.”

The players can describe any action, without needing to look at a character sheet to see if they “can” do it. As Gamemaster, I see myself as equal parts storyteller and referee. Outside of active play, my referee hat is the dominate one: I'll consult rules, errate, FAQs, and seek advice on the internet. But during active play, I don't have that time, so in order to get back into the storyteller role, I need my referee role to be minimal. Thus I put on my storyteller hat and try to use common sense to decide what happens when an issue crops up, or maybe I'll just roll a die if I think there’s some random element involved, and then the game moves on.

This works best in games where characters have fewer numbers on the character sheet, or have fewer specified abilities. In Dragon Age characters can grow in a lot of subtle and nuanced ways. However, it does't much matter, for 90% of the game any given "thing" works pretty much the same as any other "thing," and its all written up in plain English, with a good index...

I try to make sure the players understand what their characters can do, before play, how any of their specific special rules work, and I try to make sure I have an idea of what every character can do. But the rules and the math doesn't necessarily matter during the game; as long as I have a clear idea of the character's concept I do not consult the rules.

Let go of the Players!
Step two of my GMing style involves throwing game balance out the window.

The Dragon Age game is a dark fantasy world, with all its perils, contradictions, and surprises: it shouldn't be thought of as a “game setting” where reality somehow twists to always produce challenges of just the right difficulty for the party’s level of experience. The party has no “right” only to encounter bad guys they can defeat, no “right” only to encounter traps they can disarm, no “right” to invoke a particular rule from the books, and no “right” to a die roll in every particular circumstance.

Sometimes you fight enemies far below your skill level (and get to look like a bad ass), sometimes you gith enemies who are your equal in every way (and get to look like a bad ass), and on occassion, you are faced with an impossible to overcome foe... (and get to look like a bad ass!)

These sorts of situations aren’t a mistake in the rules, or a failing by the Gamemaster. Game balance just isn’t terribly important in old-style gaming. It’s not a tournament where the players are against the GM. It’s a story with dice: the players describe their actions, acting in my storyteller role, I describe the results, and the story of the characters, epic or disastrous, grows out of the combined efforts of me and my players. If things go well, I will be just as surprised by the results as the players!

The rules aren’t fragile, and the game doesn’t collapse if someone makes a little mistake or one character is temporarily more powerful than the others, or an encounter is “too hard.” Sometimes the GM will make a bad call. These aren’t tragedies. A roleplaying game is like the Internet – it doesn’t break if you push the wrong buttons. Game balance just isn’t a critical matter.

Now, when I say game balance I don't mean throw out classes and levels, the stunt system, or any other aspect of the rules as written. I mean during actual gameplay, you shouldn't worry about making sure everything is in some sort of esoteric balance. Don't worry, let the players go their own way and do their own thing. If things get to rough, they'll let you know. If things get to easy, they'll let you know. Roleplaying is an art, not a science.

One last point about game balance, though. Just as the players have no right to depend upon a rule in the book, the GM has no right, ever, to tell the player what a character decides to do. That’s the player’s decision (unless there’s a charm spell or mind control power going). The GM in my style of game has much more “power” than many modern game systems will tell you they should have, and a GM following my advice may be tempted to dictate what characters are doing. If this happens, the whole game becomes nothing more than one dude telling a story while others roll dice on command. This sort of behavior severely damages the fun of the game. You don’t make chess moves for your opponent in a game of chess, and the GM doesn’t play the characters in a roleplaying game.
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Postby Aldaris » Tue Dec 15, 2009 3:03 pm

That's certainly sound advice for any aspiring GM Batgirl. And I sometimes need to remind myself of this (particularly the "let go of the players" part) even after playing for 19 years. It is also important to get this point across to the players: as a good GM, you're usually not trying your hardest to screw them over, but it's not always rainbows and unicorns. Not always having the upper hand makes victory all the sweeter. So long as the players understand that you as the GM are not working against them, but with them to have a good story and thus fun, everything is fine.
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Postby Batgirl III » Tue Dec 15, 2009 4:07 pm

I don't always follow my own advice, naturally. But I find it helpful to try to remind myself of what I believe the game should be... I basically just ripped that essay right from my MnM thread, but the principles still apply, and retyping it tonight was a good refresher.
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Postby YourSwordisMine » Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:53 pm

Good to see you here as well as the Thinktank Batgirl. Quality stuff as always. Keep it up!
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Postby Saisei » Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:39 am

Nice post Batgirl. They're two beliefs I try to GM myself.

I remember about a decade or so ago when I was first introduced to RPs (And at the time DnD) in the shape of Baldur's Gate. I played that game to DEATH, and will usually go back to it once a year.

The thing I'm thankful to BG for most is that it nudged me towards RPing. I actually reverse engineered the rules from the game (Ah 2e...) just so me and my mates can play.

Anyway my point is up until about a year or two ago the rules were the be all and end all for me in a game. It was only when I really started GMing that trying to have your story be bent around the rules just doesn't work.

My best experience as a GM was RPing for 3 friends in a Unisystem horror game. 5 hours of a game and 3 dice rolls.

Since then I've always tried to get back to that as a GM. It was actually that session that turned me away from 4e (I had been and still kinda am a big fan) and onto more games that nurtured story.

And hey, here I am! Over ten years later and a videogame dubbed the spiritual successor to Baldurs Gate is released in Dragon Age. And wouldn't you know it my love of RPing has shot through the roof again.
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Postby Batgirl III » Thu Dec 17, 2009 8:12 pm

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Batgirl's Guide to Dark Fantasy
A Dragon Age RPG Genre Rant

Dark Fantasy is a subgenre that combines elements of fantasy, including marvelous abilities, with those of horror. Generally speaking stories in the subgenre are cosmic horror stories, in which humanity is threatened by forces beyond human understanding, but set in a fantastic, magical world.

There is a strong overlap between the dark fantasy subgenre and the sword and sorcery subgenre. Both share their often bleak, pessimistic tones, and moral ambiguity is rife. Stories set in the more traditional High Fantasy genre tend towards more dualistic morality - good is clearly good, and evil is more clearly evil.

Dark fantasy is also used to refer to "grittier" fantasy, those settings which try to represent and somehow enhance the brutality of the medieval period with their fantasy settings, generally with a dash of supernatural horror, often heavily influenced by Robert E. Howard and H.P. Lovecraft.

Just to help you scrath that itch, here are my reading, gaming, and viewing recommendations:

Comic Books
:->: Red Sonja especially the Dynamite Entertainment run.
:->: Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis Yes, I said Aquaman. This revamp of the venerable superhero tried to infuse sword and sorcery elements into the comic. Sales were bad, but I liked it.

Film / Television
:->: Ladyhawke
:->: Dragonslayer
:->: Pan's Labyrinth
:->: Roar
:->: Kingdom of Heaven
:->: The Lord of the Rings (in part)

Literature
:->: Glen Cook's The Black Company series.
:->: Robert E. Howard's Conan The Barbarian
:->: Robert E. Howard's Solomon Kane
:->: David Weber's Bahzell series
:->: Michael Moorcock's [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elric_of_Melniboné]Elric Saga[/url] (a deconstruction)
:->: Simon Hawke's Birthright: The Iron Throne

Video Games
:->: Dragon Age: Origins... duh.
:->: Diablo (slightly less so for Diablo II)
:->: Demon's Souls
:->: American McGee's Alice
BARON wrote:I'm talking batgirl with batgirl. I love you internet.
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